Thursday, December 15, 2011

"The Hobbit: An Unexpected Journey" sets forth on its quest in December of next year


"The Hobbit: An Unexpected Journey" sets forth on its quest in December of next year, bringing moviegoers their first dose of Middle-Earth big-screen goodness in almost a decade. It's just the first silo of a two-part "Lord of the Rings" prequel, too, so we'll have even more to look forward to when "There and Back Again" hits in December 2013.

We've long known that "The Hobbit" would be split into two movies, but the breaking point between the two films has remained unclear. How much of J.R.R. Tolkien's story would make it into the first "Hobbit" movie? What are we in store for?

Thanks to a plot synopsis unearthed by Bleeding Cool, we've got our answer.
Keep reading for the official "Unexpected" plot details.

Synopsis:
The adventure follows the journey of title character Bilbo Baggins, who is swept into an epic quest to reclaim the lost Dwarf Kingdom of Erebor from the fearsome dragon Smaug. Approached out of the blue by the wizard Gandalf the Grey, Bilbo finds himself joining a company of thirteen dwarves led by the legendary warrior, Thorin Oakenshield. Their journey will take them into the Wild; through treacherous lands swarming with Goblins and Orcs, deadly Wargs and Giant Spiders, Shapeshifters and Sorcerers.

Although their goal lies to the East and the wastelands of the Lonely Mountain first they must escape the goblin tunnels, where Bilbo meets the creature that will change his life forever…Gollum.

Here, alone with Gollum, on the shores of an underground lake, the unassuming Bilbo Baggins not only discovers depths of guile and courage that surprise even him, he also gains possession of Gollum’s “precious” ring that holds unexpected and useful qualities … A simple, gold ring that is tied to the fate of all Middle-earth in ways Bilbo cannot begin to know.



Press Release

From Academy Award®-winning filmmaker Peter Jackson comes The Hobbit: An Unexpected Journey, the first of two films adapting the enduringly popular masterpiece The Hobbit, by J.R.R. Tolkien. The second film will be The Hobbit: There and Back Again.

Both films are set in Middle-earth 60 years before The Lord of the Rings, which Jackson and his filmmaking team brought to the big screen in the blockbuster trilogy that culminated with the Oscar®-winning The Lord of the Rings: The Return of the King.

The adventure follows the journey of title character Bilbo Baggins, who is swept into an epic quest to reclaim the lost Dwarf Kingdom of Erebor from the fearsome dragon Smaug. Approached out of the blue by the wizard Gandalf the Grey, Bilbo finds himself joining a company of thirteen dwarves led by the legendary warrior, Thorin Oakenshield. Their journey will take them into the Wild; through treacherous lands swarming with Goblins and Orcs, deadly Wargs and Giant Spiders, Shapeshifters and Sorcerers.

Although their goal lies to the East and the wastelands of the Lonely Mountain first they must escape the goblin tunnels, where Bilbo meets the creature that will change his life forever…Gollum.

Here, alone with Gollum, on the shores of an underground lake, the unassuming Bilbo Baggins not only discovers depths of guile and courage that surprise even him, he also gains possession of Gollum’s “precious” ring that holds unexpected and useful qualities … A simple, gold ring that is tied to the fate of all Middle-earth in ways Bilbo cannot begin to know.

Ian McKellen returns as Gandalf the Grey, the character he played in The Lord of the Rings trilogy, and Martin Freeman in the central role of Bilbo Baggins. Also reprising their roles from The Lord of the Rings movies are: Cate Blanchett as Galadriel; Ian Holm as the elder Bilbo; Christopher Lee as Saruman; Hugo Weaving as Elrond; Elijah Wood as Frodo; Orlando Bloom as Legolas; and Andy Serkis as Gollum.

The ensemble cast also includes (in alphabetical order) Richard Armitage, John Bell, Jed Brophy, Adam Brown, John Callen, Luke Evans, Stephen Fry, Ryan Gage, Mark Hadlow, Peter Hambleton, Barry Humphries, Stephen Hunter, William Kircher, Evangeline Lilly, Sylvester McCoy, Bret McKenzie, Graham McTavish, Mike Mizrahi, James Nesbitt, Dean O’Gorman, Lee Pace, Mikael Persbrandt, Conan Stevens, Ken Stott, Jeffrey Thomas, and Aidan Turner.

The screenplays for both The Hobbit: An Unexpected Journey and The Hobbit: There and Back Again are by Fran Walsh, Philippa Boyens, Guillermo del Toro and Peter Jackson. Jackson is also producing the films, together with Fran Walsh and Carolynne Cunningham. The executive producers are Alan Horn, Ken Kamins, Toby Emmerich and Zane Weiner, with Boyens serving as co-producer.

Under Jackson’s direction, both movies are being shot consecutively in digital 3D using the latest camera and stereo technology. Filming is taking place at Stone Street Studios, Wellington, and on location around New Zealand.

Among the creative behind-the-scenes team returning to Jackson’s crew are director of photography Andrew Lesnie, production designer Dan Hennah, conceptual designers Alan Lee and John Howe, composer Howard Shore and make-up and hair designer Peter King. The costumes are designed by Ann Maskrey and Richard Taylor. The score is being composed by Howard Shore.

Taylor is also overseeing the design and production of weaponry, armour and prosthetics which are once again being made by the award winning Weta Workshop. Weta Digital take on the visual effects for both films, led by the film’s visual effects supervisor, Joe Letteri. Post production will take place at Park Road Post Production in Wellington.

The Hobbit: An Unexpected Journey and The Hobbit: There and Back Again are productions of New Line Cinema and MGM, with New Line managing production. Warner Bros Pictures is handling worldwide theatrical distribution, with select international territories as well as all international television licensing, being handled by MGM.

The Hobbit: An Unexpected Journey will be released beginning December 14, 2012. The second film, The Hobbit: There and Back Again, is slated for release the following year, beginning December 13, 2013.

1 comment:

Freddallas said...

NBC's Chuck Todd, Mark Murray, and Domenico Montanaro
CONCORD, NH -- Talk about night and day -- or, more accurately, night and morning. At last night’s GOP presidential debate, Mitt Romney’s rivals largely took a pass at hitting the front-runner for the Republican nomination. But at this morning’s NBC/Facebook debate here, they piled on Romney in the first 30 minutes; the arrows were out from the start. As he has on the campaign trail, Newt Gingrich called Romney a “timid Massachusetts moderate.” Rick Santorum added, “If his record was so great as governor of Massachusetts why didn't he run for reelection?... We want someone who's gonna stand up and fight for the conservative principles, not bail out and not run and not run to the left of Ted Kennedy.” And Jon Huntsman took issue with Romney’s criticism of Huntsman serving as President Obama’s ambassador to China: “This nation is divided … because of attitudes like that.”
*** But the pile-on lost steam: But after those first 30 minutes, Romney’s rivals mostly stopped their criticism. In fact, the entire debate was a metaphor for the entire GOP campaign -- piling on Romney lost its steam. Collectively, the group just doesn't seem to know how to sustain the attack, and that explains why Romney is ahead now and why he is getting closer and closer to becoming a "de facto" nominee. (Romney also did a pretty good job of parrying the attacks that came his way.) The big exception to the polite second half came at the end, however, when Gingrich and Romney sparred over the Super PAC TV ads that attacked Gingrich in Iowa. Also, it was striking to us that Romney admitted that he never thought he’d be able to beat Ted Kennedy in 1994. And Romney struggled a tad in his exchange with Gingrich over his work at Bain Capital, revealing that this remains a real vulnerability for him in a general election.
*** Huntsman’s strong performance: It came during the 15th debate of the GOP campaign, but Huntsman delivered perhaps his strongest debate performance of the cycle. He summed up the rationale for his candidacy when he said he wanted to unify the country and restore trust. We have two questions, though. One, is that message of unity and trust what Republican voters want to hear? And two, did Huntsman’s strong performance come too late?
*** Santorum starts strong then fades: Santorum also did well, too. That said, he was forced to admit that he voted for the 2003 Medicare prescription-drug law without paying for it. And he also seemed to fade a bit down the stretch. It’s not that he did anything wrong, but he seemed an afterthought, especially after his first volleys at Romney. His answer that he would love his son if he were gay could be a moment that gets played on TV in the next 24 hours, and it was a strong moment for him.
*** Breaking down the others: Gingrich was calm in the attack and seemed happy to have the fight… Paul was mostly an afterthought and didn’t get the applause lines he normally does from his supporters in the crowd... And while Perry poked fun at himself for his past “oops” moment -- he was able to name all three cabinet agencies he’d cut -- he was a bystander for much of the debate. After his disappointing fifth-place finish in Iowa, did he give a rationale why he should stay in the race? It didn’t seem that way to these pairs of eyes.